Hockey Glove Weigh-In

By Kyle Stevenson, Pure Hockey Marketing

There are few pieces of gear more important than a players’ hockey gloves. Having a comfortable, lightweight, protective glove is vital to feeling confident going into a game. While this test can’t address a glove’s comfort or protection level, it will certainly help out with the weight discussion.
Our Glove Weigh-in…..
                                                                             Single Glove (Grams)            Pair (Grams)
Warrior Bully                                                                 269                                          538
Warrior Luxe                                                                 273                                          546
Easton RS                                                                    278                                          556
Easton EQ50                                                               281                                          562
Easton PH E-Pro                                                        285                                           570
CCM U+ CL                                                                 296                                           592
Bauer Vapor APX                                                        297                                           594
Bauer 4 Roll                                                                305                                           610
Warrior Franchise                                                      307                                           614
Bauer TotalOne                                                          319                                           638
Bauer Vapor APX Pro                                                326                                           652
Eagle PPF                                                                   337                                           674
The results: A bit surprising to me that the lightest Bauer glove was the 7th lightest in the group, but again you have to take the weight and the protection into consideration. In many cases, a glove with more padding and more protection is going to be slightly heavier. Not every player wants or needs that much protection so sometimes the sacrifice is worth it.
Good Showing for Warrior, too, finishing with the top 2 lightest gloves, and also for Easton with the next 3 lightest.  All Gloves weighed were 14” inch retail models.
Let us know what you think @PureHockey and on Facebook.

 


Hockey Skate Weigh-In

 

Kyle Stevenson, Pure Hockey Marketing

So a couple of weeks back, we posted a list of some stick weights on high-end composite sticks and we got a really great response, so we are going to continue this over the next few weeks in some different product categories. Today we start with skates in the price range of $599.99 and up (other price ranges will follow).

NOTE: this is not necessarily a list of THE top lightest skates available; not every model is listed, but we feel this is a good representation of what is present on the market. Secondly, weight should not be your only criteria for purchasing a pair of skates! It is definitely a factor in a multi-step process of determining what is best for you. But it’s not the only thing you should be thinking about!

Weights were measured of a single skate, size 7.5D. So, what you see listed below is the skate model, the weight of a single skate in grams and then that weight doubled to represent the pair.

Model
1) Bauer TotalOne NXG                         —-680g   ——1360g   ———- $799.99
2) Bauer Vapor APX                                —-718g   ——1436g   ———- $799.99
3) Bauer Supreme One.9                      —-746g   ——1492g   ———- $599.99
4) Bauer Vapor X7.0                               —-805g   ——1610g   ———- $599.99
5) CCM U+ CL                                         —-830g   ——1660g   ———- $599.99
6) Reebok 20K                                        —-833g   ——1666g   ———- $799.99
7) Reebok 18K                                        —-834g   ——1668g   ———- $599.99
8) Easton RS                                           —-843g   ——1686g   ———- $599.99
9) Bauer Nexus 800                               —-890g   ——1780g   ———- $599.99
So there you have it! The Bauer TotalOne NXG’s  top the list and the Supreme and Vapor lines follow close behind. Bauer has the top 4 slots! Let us know what you think and what else you would like to see compared in the comments section below, on the our Facebook page and also at our Twitter page.

 

 


Easton RS Hockey Skate Review

By Kyle Stevenson, Pure Hockey Marketing

Having fallen in love with my S-17 skates over the past few years, I get excited whenever Easton is releasing a new skate model. I got to demo the EQ50’s just prior to their release a couple seasons back and I was pretty let down. They were real bulky and not particularly comfortable. This doesn’t mean EQ50 skates are bad for you, they just didn’t work for me.  So when the RS hockey skates were coming out, I tried to keep my expectations in check a little bit. Having said that, I can tell you that after a couple of game in them, they are my next pair of skates. I knew it after wearing them for about an hour.

The RS skate impressed me right out of the box. It is a real sleek, sharp looking skate. They were really comfortable as soon as I put them on – and yes, I caught some crap for wearing them around the office the rest of the day, but hey, I was excited and they were that comfortable.

When I first laced them up for a game, I didn’t tie the top eyelet, mostly out of habit. I do this to allow myself some more forward flex, as I don’t like when a skate is so stiff that it restricts my stride going forward. Within minutes of hitting the ice, I could tell there was too much play in the ankle for this. The RS has a lower profile and once I tied it to the top, it was perfect – a great amount of forward flex, combined with excellent lateral stiffness and response. I love a stiff skate and the RS is stiff and responds great on strides.

I’ve been getting high ankle cuts on my last couple pairs of skates from abrasion on tight/hard turns, so Easton’s new comfort edge feature really interests me. I like the idea of that type of protection and it has been a great addition to skates like the TotalOne and TotalOne NXG, even though I haven’t truly been able to test how effective the feature is.

On the back end of the skate, Easton put in a new injected tendon guard that is very strong and helps your foot to recoil on strides. You can really feel the extra support. On the inside of the skate, Easton added extra foam padding inside the tendon guard for a little extra comfort. Although I am used to a much thicker felt tongue, the RS’s felt tongue is really comfortable and has no signs of lace bite. There is also a little extra padding in the front, in case you take a slapshot  off the laces.

New to the RS skate is Easton’s Giro SuperNatural Fit footbed system. This comes with three sizes of adjustable arch inserts. This is a good idea, but in practice is a little gimmicky, there doesn’t feel like there is a big difference between the smallest and largest inserts.

My main issue with the skates is the Razor Bladz elite runner. The holder itself is great, it is very stiff, responsive and extremely light. The Elite steel runner is the issue, it’s just too weak for me. I can feel it give and bow as I make tight turns or hard stops. Remember, though, issues with blades are very personal and subjective – the Elite runners may be just fine for you, this is really a personal thing with me.

Overall the RS skate really really impressed me – I really love it. Barring some ridiculous new unannounced skate being released, the RS will be my next skate.

Have a look and order yourself some right here.

…..and here’s my video review:


Easton Stealth RS Hockey Stick Review

By Kyle Stevenson, Marketing

After a couple months and finally having a chance to use it on a consistent basis, I have my decision on the Easton Stealth RS stick: unbelievable!


I have used the Stealth line since Easton came out with the elliptical taper on the S-17’s. The last five years I have almost exclusively used two stick lines, Easton Stealth (S-17, S-19, RS) and Warrior Dolomites. This review is going to be a little bit about using the newest Stealth released back in the fall, the RS.

When I used the S-17, I picked it up and loved it. The S-19 – same thing – one shot and I was in heaven. The RS however, I almost considered putting away after the first skate, where I used it in warm-ups and then benched it. It rode the pine in favor of the Dolomite for the game, but at the end I decided to give it another try and I ended up loving it. It just took a little more time to get used to than its predecessors.

The model I use is the RS Hall Curve (think Sakic, P92, Draper) 85 Flex, non-grip. Upon taking the first shot, I immediately noticed two things, it has a much different kick-point than I expected (based on using the other two) and it’s a very whippy stick. Leaning into shots, it felt much softer than an 85 Flex, and the stick was noticeably flexing forward on my release and follow-through. As I figured out how the stick was going to react, I couldn’t believe how smooth the puck was coming off the blade. Without exaggeration, snapshots felt like they were coming off as smooth as a saucer pass, just rolling off the blade. On top of the great feel, I was putting the puck where I wanted. A symphony of pipes in warm-ups.

There is nothing like the release on this stick, I haven’t ever used anything that came close. Just lightning fast. I lean into a snapshot and its gone. It creates and incredible advantage if you find yourself with an open shot and only need to beat the ‘tendy. As soon as you see the goalie shuffle across and it flashes in your mind “shoot now” before he sets, its gone. You can go from thinking shoot to release so quick that it’s mind-blowing. The advantage of being able to release so quick is so important in today’s game – goalies are big, but still quick – so being able to place it where you want when you need to is crucial, and the RS allows you to do it.

The most noticeable improvement I see from the S-19 is the feel of the blade. Again, when I first touched the puck with it I thought it had absolutely zero feel and it felt like a hard blade. As I got used to it, I liked the feel a lot more. I realized it didn’t feel like no feel, it was just a much different feel. Playing with it now, I can really feel the puck a lot more so than I did with the S-19. A month later now, I can tell you I think that great feel comes at a cost, the heel and toe of this stick have worn out a little and chipped and splintered quicker than most sticks I have used. I can’t say for certain why, but the RS blade does not seem to have great durability.

On the other side of the durability discussion, I think the RS shaft feels a lot sturdier than the previous Stealths. The problem I have with the shaft is the grip. As I mentioned I use the non-grip, and as sweet as that matte black looks, I think it makes the stick a bit slicker. I haven’t used one, but I have held the grip version and I can instantly tell you it is way to sticky for me. I’m particular, and need a bit of grip without going overboard; the RS doesn’t really have that option. Its none or too much in my eyes. With the non-grip, I felt I needed more shaft tape than I would normally put on. I found myself looking for something in between the clear and grip shafts.

Overall the Easton RS is an amazing twig. Easton never ceases to astonish me with their innovations. Since the S17 came out, I have found that here is nothing like the first snapshot with a newly released Stealth model.